The Potter’s Freedom by James R. White

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Norman Geisler’s disturbing book, Chosen But Free (see our review) sent ripples of anger throughout the Reformed community, not so much for what it said, but for what it claimed to be. In that book, Geisler wants the reader to believe that he is a champion of a moderate form of Calvinism, labeling the usual Calvinistic understanding as “extreme Calvinism.” The problem, as anyone who knows the subject at all could attest, is that Geisler it not representing Calvinism at all, but rather four-point Arminianism. That is, he holds to eternal security but strongly rejects all the other doctrines of grace. Had Geisler owned up to his Arminianism and attempted to argue for his position, his book would have largely gone unnoticed. But when he claimed to be a Calvinist, a true Calvinist as opposed to the “extreme” variety, he stepped on some major toes.

The Potter’s Freedom is a response to Chosen But Free, but it serves double duty. First, it argues in convincing fashion against the position of Geisler, showing Geisler to be a true Arminian, regardless of his claims. Secondly, and of greater value, White clearly defends the major teachings of Calvinism.

The importance of this book lies in the second purpose. Even if you do not agree with all of his conclusions you will at least have a good understanding of the biblical base upon which Calvinism is founded. This is one of the best resources for this that I have seen.

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