The Melungeons by N. Brent Kennedy

An interesting account of the possible origins of the mysterious Melungeons. Kennedy traces the incomplete record of this race of people found mostly in Virginia, North Carolina and Tennessee, all the way back to the 15th century. This is also the sorry story of the discrimination against the Melungeons, which in many ways rivals that of the Blacks and possibly exceeds that of the American Indian....

The Hedge of Thorns by Mark Hamby

This is a supposed true account of John Carrol and his sister Bell who lived in 17th century England. Taken from Carrol’s own account and first published in 1819 by John Hatchard, the story has been rewritten and published by Mark Hamby for modern readers. This is a highly moving little story of a literal hedge of thorns designed to protect travelers from perils that lay beyond, but which became most harmful when transgressed. Carrol’s sad encounter with the thorn hedge as a child foreshadows his spiritual experience as a young man. Had he learned the lesson the literal thorns could have taught he would have been spared the tragic consequences of later years. This book is written that others might learn the lessons John Carrol disregarded. A most interesting story....

Still Waters by W. Phillip Keller

Warning! This book may be hazardous to your peace of mind. I picked up Still Waters thinking that it would be a devotional work along the line of the author’s famous and excellent, A Shepherd Looks at the Twenty Third Psalm, but quickly realized that this was a totally different kind of book. Still Waters is the account of Keller’s and his second wife’s escape from the noise, busyness and rush of modern society. They bought a comfortable cabin in a beautiful wooded area beside a small lake, where they explore and enjoy all the aspects of this life of quietness and solitude. Keller details these wonders in chapters filled with the glories of nature. This book is not about God or Christian living as such; it is about rest and quiet. On the positive side it is well written and interesting. On the negative it creates a great...

Seabiscuit, an American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand

For anyone who loves sports in general and the history of horse racing in particular, Seabiscuit is a classic. This is a meticulously researched true account that reads like a fast-paced novel. It is a nonfiction story that is better than fiction. Seabiscuit, for the uninitiated, was arguably the third best racehorse to have ever run, behind only Man of War and Secretariat. He ran in the 1930s where his exploits electrified and depressed a nation....

Eats, Shoots & Leaves by Lynne Truss

Have you ever considered reading a book on punctuation? No? You will change your mind if you read Eats, Shoots and Leaves. Truss’ book has been a best seller in England for some time, but has jumped the pond and is now a hit in America. Truss actually teaches sound principles concerning punctuation and makes it enjoyable. I would recommend this book for anyone who writes as part of his job or ministry. For that matter, anyone who wants to write in proper form will benefit from this volume....

Death of Outrage: Bill Clinton and the Assault on American Ideals by William J. Bennett

Of all the books that have been, and will be, written on Bill Clinton and his scandalized Presidency, surely this one will reign supreme. Written by a man with a strong political background and author of the Book of Virtues, Bennett has become the unofficial keeper of the moral flame in Washington. While not a Christian, to my knowledge, most believers will line up with his view of values, and will applaud what he has to say in The Death of Outrage. Bennett rightly recognizes that we are fast becoming a nation of people who believe that economic stability is vastly more important than personal character. “If these arguments take root in American soil,” so writes Bennett, “If they become the coin of the public realm – we will have validated them, and we will come to rue the day we did” (p.9). For, says our author, “In America,...

Common Sense by Thomas Paine

Common Sense, the famous “pamphlet” published on January 10, 1776 by Thomas Paine, was a powerful call for American independence from England. It met with immediate success and had numerous reprints, tipping the scales in the minds of many toward the Revolution. At the same time it brought resolve and courage to those who fought for the cause. In Paine’s mind it made common sense to rebel against England. It was the right time; America had the necessary resources; the monarchy of England was a governmental system to avoid; even God and Scripture were on the side of the colonies. Paine appealed to the pride of Americans, their natural rights, the benefit of national debt, their financial well-being, their aspirations for the future, as well as their common sense to move for independence without delay. As he intoned in the appendix of a subsequent edition of Common Sense, “We...

Building the Kingdom of God on Earth by Martin Erdmann

Building the Kingdom of God on Earth is an excellent work which informs us of the past and gives us much to consider for the future. Erdmann writes of the era when World War I was approaching and a number of influential people gave thought to what could possibly abolish war and solve most of the world’s social ills. Following the Great War it was determined by many that only a “new world order” could accomplish such a feat. With the signing of the Treaty of Versailles many felt the seeds for the next world war were planted and, as the next twenty years demonstrated, they were correct. Something had to be done about war and its lasting devastation. A new world order was urgently needed but standing in its way was the issue of nationalism. John Foster Dulles, the principle mover behind the new world order, believed the...