Left Behind by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins

Left Behind is the first in a trilogy of novels dealing with the end times. Left Behind , written by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins, begins on the day that the Rapture takes place and concludes just as the Antichrist is about to assume power over the world. The story however, is wrapped around the lives of a handful of individuals who come face to face with the fact that the Rapture has occurred. Will they come to Christ, or be taken in by the false explanations for the disappearance of millions throughout the world. And if they come to the Lord, what will it cost them? Left Behind is not classic literature but it is an interesting story, easy to read, and thought provoking (especially as we watch the how the Antichrist begins to deceive everyone around him). The book takes a pretribulational approach and views the book...

Holy War by John Bunyan

I won’t waste time critiquing a classic as well known as Holy War . It is Bunyan’s second best known allegory and, in my opinion, for what it is worth, is even more interesting than Pilgrim’s Progress. For those who would want a more modern version, try Ethel Barrett’s paraphrase....

Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

Published in 1902 by Polish-born English novelist Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness has long been considered a classic. The story itself is ordinary enough; a sailor travels into the midst of the Congo jungle to engage in the ivory trade. There is no romance, little action, but a few moments of violence. Conrad uses only words to hold his audience’s attention, but my how he uses words. Few writers, past or present, can rival this man in his use of descriptive language. Perhaps this is why virtually every college literature course seems to require the reading of this little novel, often to the dismay of the students. Conrad’s greatness lies in the fact that he is not really spinning a story about a journey into the heart of the Congo, but a journey into the blackness of the heart and soul of man. When a man, a good man,...

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J. K. Rowling

The best selling books in America at this time (November 1999) are the three fictional volumes by J.K. Rowling about the life of a boy named Harry Potter. These are books about magic, witches, wizards, dragons and all that goes with such fairy tales. They are written for children and thus are simple, both in reading style and story line. Certainly not destined to be classic works, they are nevertheless fun and interesting. The question on the minds of many Christians is whether these books are also dangerous. They deal with the “dark” side, the world of magic, in a very positive and attractive way. Would such fiction attract children to the real world of the dark arts, which is not nearly so pleasant? That is a question the discerning reader will have to settle in his or her own mind. As for the books themselves, having read only...