The Myth of A.D.D. Biblically Redefined by Andrew George and Lindsay Pretious

The philosophy and worldview of secular psychology have not only shaped much of the world but have also inundated the church of Christ. Believers have somehow forgotten, or have chosen to ignore, that psychological systems (and there are hundreds of them) are not neutral—they are competing with the teachings of Scripture. Therefore, any attempt to integrate the views of psychology with those of God’s Word are doomed from the start. Yet Christians, who have been warned not to “walk in the counsel of the wicked” (Psalm 1:1), to beware of the “doctrines of demons” (1 Timothy 4:1), to have nothing to do with worldly fables (1 Timothy 3:7) and to seek God’s wisdom not the world’s (James 3:13-18), insist that great profit can be had by combining biblical truth with worldly precepts found in psychology. Nowhere is this trend more evident than with the ADD and ADHD lie which...

The Complete Husband by Lou Priolo

This volume contains a familiar rehash of neuthetic counseling principles and concepts. There is nothing particularity new here for those knowledgeable of this genre, but for those who are not, a great deal of the contents should prove helpful. While The Complete Husband contains much good information there are also several issues of concern. Some of these issues (listed below) are important enough that I would recommend limited and careful use of this book. 1. Believers are broken into two categories that will be familiar to readers of neuthetic literature: the feeling-oriented and the obedience-oriented (p.24). But what about a third option, one more in tune with New Testament teaching as opposed to Old Testament? I speak of the Spirit-filled or Spirit-controlled-oriented person. 2. I Peter 3:7 does not tell us to understand our wives, but to live with them in an “understanding way” (p.24). There is a world...

Successful Christian Parenting by John MacArthur

At last, a book on raising children that claims to be biblical and actually uses the Bible. This is far rarer than might be imagined since most Christian writers give passing notice to Scripture then thrust upon the unsuspecting reader a philosophy of parenting that is either based on pop-psychology or legalism. MacArthur manages to thread his way between these two land mines and give us solid principles based upon the Word of God. We must distinguish here between the unquestionable teachings of Scripture and the subjective applications, as I am sure MacArthur would agree. Elevating an application or technique to the level of biblical authority is a common error among Christian “family experts.” MacArthur attempts to avoid this, and I believe he does a good job. Successful Christian Parenting deals well with all of the major passages on the subject. I was happy to find that in the...

Love and Respect by Emerson Eggerichs

Eggerichs has placed his finger squarely on the key to a God-honoring and happy marriage. Love and Respect is based on the commands found in Ephesians 5:33 that crystallize the responsibility of the husband, which is to love his wife, and the responsibility of the wife, which is to respect her husband. Many have theorized as to why our Lord chose these particular things as foundational. Eggerichs believes that they are needs—the husband needs respect, the wife love. Perhaps, but it could also be that God so designed marriage to function with the love/respect dynamic, or it could be that these specific traits are the most difficult, the most unnatural for us to give one another. Or, it may be all three. Nevertheless, Eggerichs’ focus on these two actions/attitudes is right on the money. The author lays out three cycles around which his book is developed. The “crazy cycle”...

Lawfully Wedded by Renald Showers

This little booklet tackles the question of “what is marriage?” and its corollary, “what makes a man and woman husband and wife?” Through a careful examination of Scripture, Showers demonstrates that the sexual act does not constitute a marriage, rather it is the making of a marriage covenant in which a couple vows to be husband and wife. “When the covenanted man and woman enter into sexual union, they are putting into practice what they previously had covenanted to do” (p.16). This is an excellent little study for any dealing with this particular subject....

I Kissed Dating Goodbye by Joshua Harris

Harris’ book has caused quite a stir in the Christian community and with good reason. He has dared to scrap the Western dating system and replace it with one that he believes more fully honors God. I Kissed Dating Goodbye, while certainly not the final word on the subject, is well worth reading and pondering. Harris has rightly observed that our present dating scheme is froth with dangers. First, there are the moral temptations that challenge the resolve of even the strongest Christian. Next there is the issue of over commitment at a time of life when lasting commitment is impossible. Add to that the broken hearts, distracted minds, lopsided relationships and spiritual retardation that often accompanies dating, especially of the young, and you start to get a handle on the problem. Harris’ solution is to develop a different mindset. He encourages young people to focus on family, friends...

He’s H.O.T., She’s H.O.T. by Jeramy Clark and Jerusha Clark

A number of fine Christian books have been published recently dealing with the subject of dating. Josh Harris’ I Kissed Dating Goodbye is perhaps the best known, and certainly the most hotly debated. The Clarks have written two books – this one and I Gave Dating a Chance, to offer an option for those who could not buy Harris’ concepts. The Clarks believe that believers can date to the glory of God, but the key to godly dating lies in the pursuit of proper qualities, qualities they describe as HOT. “H” stands for holy and “T” for trustworthy. Searching for a dating partner and/or an eventual mate who is holy and trustworthy would, without question, modify and enhance the overall dating environment of believers. I was not as enthusiastic with the “O” or outrageous, which is defined as “remarkable, exceptional, extraordinary, special, unique, memorable, wonderful, marvelous, striking, electrifying, and...

Discovering the Mind of a Woman by Ken Nair

This is one of those marriage books which scores points on the big issues and loses them in the details. Nair’s central thesis is right on the money: “Christlikeness is God’s first priority for every man” (p. 6). He then takes this thesis and attempts to work it out in the dynamics of marriage. Again Nair’s broad strokes are good, since a Christlike man will make every attempt to understand his wife (1 Peter 3:7) and lead her spiritually (Ephesians 5:25-27). The Christlike husband will put his wife’s needs before his own and love her as Christ loves the church. All of this is excellent—and if this is all Nair said then we could highly recommend Discovering the Mind of a Woman. However, he says much more. First, Nair is very careless in his use of Scripture, often ripping verses out of context or simply creating strange interpretations (pp....

As for Me and My House by Walter Wangerin Jr.

This is an excellent book on Christian marriage, written in autobiographical form by someone who really knows how to turn a phrase. When I first sat down to read this book my intention was to skim through rather quickly, gleaning whatever was of value. But I was soon arrested by first the writing ability of the author, and then impressed with the content of the volume. The strongest section of the book, which contains five chapters, is on the subject of forgiveness. There he covers well the biblical teaching on forgiveness but he does so by opening a window to his own marriage, which sailed through turbulent waters for a number of years. While As for Me and My House would be helpful to any couple, it is best suited for those who have been married a while and perhaps are struggling with their relationship. If the principles within...

Age of Opportunity by Paul David Tripp

This is the best book I have ever read on the subject of raising teenagers in a biblical manner. Happily absent from this volume is the usual homage to psychobabble and Dear Abby self-help. Instead the proposition of the book is, “What controls my heart will control my life” (p. 30), therefore, the Christian parent’s task is to raise children with a heart for God. The principles found in Age of Opportunity are drawn from Scripture. In addition, Tripp suggests many practical ways to apply these principles. Refreshingly, Tripp admits some failure, both of his and his teens. But if there is a negative in the book it would be that the subject of rebellious teens is never addressed. What happens if the parent does all of these things and yet junior turns from God and home anyway. In Tripp’s world children all seem to respond rather quickly to...