God’s Super-Apostles Encountering the Worldwide Prophets and Apostles Movement by R. Douglas Geivett and Holly Pivec

This little volume presents an excellent overview of the New Apostolic Reformation (NAR) movement that promotes the fivefold ministry (pp. 13, 137) which teaches that God has given the church five continuing governmental offices: apostle, prophet, evangelist, pastor and teacher. Apostles as well as prophets are again active in the church today (there are about 400 of them – p. 16) and churches must submit to their authority (pp. XIII, 8, 10, 11, 96). Since NAR is a movement (pp. 3-6, 48, 125) rather than an organization, its adherents are not monolithic in their views but certain teachings can be identified including: New truths regularly being revealed by God through the modern apostles and prophets (pp. XV, 1, 50-61, 65-66). Supernatural power available to advance God’s kingdom (p. 3). Demonic warfare and the casting out of demons and generational curses (pp. 1, 49, 51, 79-90). Dominionism (p. 81), sometimes...

The Less Traveled Road and the Bible, A Scriptural Critique of the Philosophy of M. Scott Peck by H. Wayne House and Richard Abanes (Camp Hill, PA: Horizon Books: 1995), 248 pp.

M. Scott Peck, M.D., and his philosophy of life, has made considerable in-roads in the evangelical community, especially after his celebrated claim of conversion many years ago. His emphasis on discipline, love, religion and grace seems to fit well with biblical theology. Yet, as Wayne House and Richard Abanes document, all is not as it seems. Peck may claim to be a Christian, and he uses much biblical terminology and Christian lingo which at first glance may seem to be in line with conservative Christianity, but the fact is Peck’s teachings are often quite foreign to Scripture. For example Peck: Sees God more in line with Hindu pantheism (pp. 27-32, 107, 209-211), and New Age “we are god” myths (pp. 129, 179, 209-211) than with traditional Christianity. Sees the Bible as a mixture of truth, myth and error (pp. 60, 200-205), and no more inspired than he is (p....

Dreams and Visions,Is Jesus awakening the Muslim World?,by Tom Doyle with Greg Webster (Nashville: Thomas Nelson, 2012) 270 pp., paper, $15.99

Tom Doyle is a missionary in the Middle East and Central Asia and attended both the Bible Institute of Los Angeles and Dallas Theological Seminary (p. 133). Dreams and Visions is endorsed by the likes of Anne Graham Lotz, Charles Dyer and Janet Parshall. The argument of the book is that Jesus is presenting Himself, via dreams and visions, to Muslims throughout the globe (including America – pp. 238-239) in order to draw them to Himself. Doyle believes this is the most important movement of God in our time (p. 8). Why dreams? The author suggests a number of possibilities: The Muslim religion was started by a dream to Muhammad and dreams are part of the culture in Middle Eastern countries. They were used supposedly by the gods in the region to reveal their wills; dreams are an accepted form of communication by the Muslims (p. 130). Muslims have...

Wandering Stars, Contending for the Faith with the New Apostles and Prophets, by Keith Gibson (Birmingham, AL: Solid Ground Christian Books, 2011) 306 pp., paper $12.50

Keith Gibson has written a comprehensive, well documented and most helpful book detailing the modern prophetic movement.  Much attention is given to Mike Bickle, Bob Jones, Rich Joyner and the so-called Kansas City Prophets, including the International House of Prayer ministry.  Also included is C. Peter Wagner and his International Coalition of Apostles which boasts approximately 500 “apostles” who claim comparable authority and giftedness to the New Testament apostles.  Gibson explains the roots and teachings of the Latter Rain Movement and its founder William Braham.  Prominent early prophetic leader John G. Lake is given attention as well. Wandering Stars is filled with information on the false teaching and ridiculous prophecies of many false prophets.  Gibson has read and listened to thousands of the never-ending prophesies that are published on such sites as the Elijah List.  While modern prophets uniformly claim that their revelations are “for revealing the strategic will...

Dreams and Visions, Muslims’ Miraculous Journey to Jesus by Rick Kronk (Italy: Destiny Image Europe, 2010), pp. 185, paper $11.69.

It is widely reported today that many Muslim people are coming to Christ as a direct result of dreams and visions apparently given to them by the Lord.  Rick Kronk, who has spent 20 years ministering to Islamic people, believes these reports are legitimate and has written this book in an attempt to prove his thesis. Kronk begins his book with a story of one Muslim who was converted through dreams.  This is followed by a brief but helpful chapter on the history of Islam and an overview of its core doctrinal beliefs.  Kronk offers a 2009 report claiming that there are now 1.57 billion Muslims in the world or 23% of the world’s population (p. 31).  Without question Islam has caught the attention of the world and its influence is undeniable.  Yet the author believes many Muslims are also coming to salvation these days and, of the ones...

How to Go from Being a Good Evangelical to a Committed Catholic in Ninety-five Difficult Steps by Christian Smith (Cascade Books, 2011), 205 pp., paper $24.00

Christian Smith, a self-confessed former evangelical and professor of sociology at the University of Notre Dame, was accepted into full communion of the Catholic church in 2010 (p. 2).  He writes this book not as a “theological treatise, nor an apologetic argument for Catholicism” but as a “how to book” (p. 3).  He offers 95 steps that will lead evangelicals back to Catholicism. In order to draw evangelicals to Catholicism he must first vilify evangelicalism which he does throughout the book.  He in fact identifies many true flaws in the evangelical sub-culture, but in doing so he grossly over-generalizes, misrepresents, and makes groundless accusations.  He characterizes evangelicals as stupid (see pp. 77-78), mindless followers of the herd, who if they would only come to their senses would all head toward Catholicism immediately. The discerning reader wants to cry out about every third page that what Smith writes is simply...

Born Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic by David B. Currie (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1996) 215 pp., paper $9.99

Rome Sweet Rome by Scott & Kimberly HahnBorn Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic, by David B. Currie In recent years we have witnessed a softening perspective of the vast disagreement between the Roman Catholic Church and evangelicalism.  Some leaders in both camps now proclaim that we are all brothers in Christ and any remaining differences are either minor or resolvable in time.  In addition, there has been a steady trickle of evangelicals returning to Rome, including a number of celebrated cases.  Two books that reportedly aid in the return to Rome are the subjects of this review.  I have chosen to review these works together because of their substantial overlap.  Both sets of authors were deeply ingrained in evangelicalism but ultimately chose to join the Catholic Church, and for many of the same reasons. I will begin with Rome Sweet Rome because it is less a theological defense of Rome’s...

Rome Sweet Home by Scott & Kimberly Hahn, (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1993), 183 pp. plus xiii, paper $9.99.

Rome Sweet Home by Scott & Kimberly HahnBorn Fundamentalist, Born Again Catholic, by David B. Currie In recent years we have witnessed a softening perspective of the vast disagreement between the Roman Catholic Church and evangelicalism.  Some leaders in both camps now proclaim that we are all brothers in Christ and any remaining differences are either minor or resolvable in time.  In addition, there has been a steady trickle of evangelicals returning to Rome, including a number of celebrated cases.  Two books that reportedly aid in the return to Rome are the subjects of this review.  I have chosen to review these works together because of their substantial overlap.  Both sets of authors were deeply ingrained in evangelicalism but ultimately chose to join the Catholic Church, and for many of the same reasons. I will begin with Rome Sweet Home because it is less a theological defense of Rome’s...

A Christian’s Pocket Guide to Islam by Patrick Sookhdeo

In less than 90 pages Patrick Sookhdeo gives his readers a handy primer to Islam.  Covered is Islam’s origins, history, major beliefs and customs, as well as guidance on witnessing to Muslims and caring for new converts.  A useful glossary of Islamic terms is included, as well as a short chronology of Mohammad’s life and a historical development of Islamic sects. With the exception of the implication that some Muslim’s come to Christ through the means of dreams and visions (p. 73), I believe this little volume provides an excellent understanding of the Islamic religion. ...

America, Oil, And the Islamic Mind by Michael Youssef

This is an excellent little primer outlining the basic beliefs of the Islamic religion. In addition the reader is given a brief history of Islam and a peek into the mindset of the Muslim people. The biggest drawback is that it was last updated following the Gulf War in 1991, so what has happened since is, of course, not discussed. Still, I found Youssef’s understanding of how the Islamic people think, and why they are in constant conflict with the West, to be up to speed with modern times....