Beyond Sex Roles by Gilbert Bilezikian

Beyond Sex Roles is Bilezikian’s (resident theologian at Willow Creek Community Church and professor at Wheaton College) attempt to support the egalitarian position on the role of women within the church and family. Those with a weak understanding of Scripture and/or this particular issue might be impressed with Bilezikian’s arguments. Those with a firm grasp of Scripture and well-versed in this debate will quickly realize that the author is a master of deception. He sets up so many straw men that you begin to feel as if you are in a scarecrow factory. He so thoroughly twists Scripture that you feel the need to visit a chiropractor when you lay the book down. Even the most clear and obvious means of the biblical text are convoluted to fit his presupposition that men and women have been given the same roles and responsibilities in what he calls “the age of...

Atheism Remix by R. Albert Mohler

Atheism Remix is a sort of starter kit for understanding the New Atheism which has gained much attention today. In less than 100 relatively easy to read pages Mohler explains the central elements of the New Atheism (pp. 17, 23, 25-26, 36-37, 54-63), identifies and gives a brief background for each of the key leaders: Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, Sam Harris and Christopher Hitchens (he calls them “the Four Horsemen of the New Atheist Apocalypse” (pp. 39ff), distinguishes the New Atheism from the atheism of Nietzsche, Marx, Darwin and Freud, and offers some sharp criticism via the writings of Alvin Plantinga and Alister McGrath, two well-known evangelical thinkers. Atheism Remix is not a comprehensive study of the New Atheism, but it is a good beginning and probably enough for the average Christian desiring to get a handle on what is going on. For deeper investigation the student could turn...

Above All Earthly Pow’rs by David F. Wells

Above All Earthly Pow’rs is the fourth and final volume in a series that includes No Place for Truth, God in the Wasteland and Losing Our Virtue. Each of these books deals with a theological issue in light of the times. Above All Earthly Pow’rs follows the same format, this time addressing Christology and how it “is to be preached, in a postmodern, multiethnic, multireligious society” (pp. 7-8). As in the earlier works, Wells ably sounds the alarm, warning of the inward seeds of destruction now present in evangelicalism. He deals with relevant issues as diverse as the Enlightenment, psychotherapy, immigration, the new spirituality, nihilism, postmodernity, the resurrection of Christ, self-help programs, debates over substitionary atonement, justification, open theism, the seeker-sensitive church growth movement, and more. All of these issues are examined in light of what Christology has become in a postmodern world and what must be done to...

A Discussion of the Seventeenth Century Particular Baptist Confessions of Faith by Richard P. Belcher and Anthonly Mattia

Most Baptists today probably have no idea that Baptists of the seventeenth century wrote two confessions, one in 1644, the other in 1689. These confessions bear a remarkable resemblance to the Westminster Confession of 1646. As those of the Reformed persuasion know, the Westminster Confession is highly Calvinistic. What may surprise many is how Calvinistic the Baptists of that same era were, especially in light of the Arminianism that is associated with most Baptist churches today. The particular purpose of this little book is to demonstrate that the two Baptist confessions maintained the same Reformed view of the Old Testament Law. If you have any interest in that subject this is your book, otherwise, skip it....

A Comparison of Dispensationalism and Covenant Theology by Richard P. Belcher

For those who might desire a quick overview of the basic teachings of dispensationalism and Covenant theology, I would recommend this little book. Belcher’s book is certainly not an exhaustive study, but it is presents an accurate and usually fair presentation of both views (although the author occasionally allows his Covenant theology bias to bleed through). The volume also compares and contrasts the two positions side by side on the major dividing points. The only place where I felt that the author seemed unfair was in his short discussion of the differing hermeneutics. Dispensationalists have long contended that Covenant theologians would have to change their position if they would interpret literally the Old Testament passages dealing with the kingdom. It is because they give figurative meanings to those passages that they come away with a different view concerning eschatology. Belcher, however, fails to mention this, but does accuse the...