Love Your God with All Your Mind by J. P. Moreland

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Moreland’s thesis is that the evangelical church has become anti-intellectual. If the church has had any revival in modern times it has been a revival of feeling, not of the knowledge of God. As a result, Christians are being guided more by their emotions than by their convictions; by enthusiasm more than informed commitment (see page 19).

With Moreland’s thesis I heartily agree. With much of his reasoning and suggestions I am also in agreement. There are some cautions that must be given here however. Moreland places too much faith in reason and logic for my taste. While I understand and appreciate the value of these things, it must be remembered that reasoning is not any more infallible than emotion. Logic, too, has been affected by the Fall. Only the Scriptures can be trusted completely, and while I am certain the author would agree with this statement I do not believe his book developed the idea very well.

A second concern is with Moreland’s integrationist approach. The attempt to integrate philosophy, psychological and other sciences with the Scriptures is littered with danger. Love Your God does nothing to warn of these dangers and seems to take for granted that integration, by the reasoning Christian is possible.

The last chapter threw out a number of practical suggestions on developing intellectual life in the church. Some of these ideas were a bit naive or impractical, but others are well worth considering. As with all books the reader must learn to sift.

I found most of the book enjoyable, thought provoking and helpful. But the integrationist belief would cause me to be hesitant to recommend it to any but the more discerning.

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