Ecumenical Jihad by Peter Kreeft

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This book could be quickly dismissed as a good example of pluralism (the view that all religions are legitimate ways of worshipping God), which is so foreign to Scripture as to deserve little attention. What makes Ecumenical Jihad worthy of notice are the endorsements by Chuck Colson (“Peter Kreeft is one of the premier apologists in America today, witty, incisive and powerful. On the front lines in today’s culture war, Kreeft is one of the most valiant intellectual warriors.”) and J.I. Packer (“This racy little book opens up a far-reaching theme. With entertaining insight Kreeft looks into the attitudes, alliances, and strategies that today’s state of affairs requires of believers. Catholics, Protestants, and Orthodox alike need to ponder Peter Kreeft’s vision of things – preferably, in discussion together. What if he is right?).

Just what could Kreeft be correct about:

· That the cultural wars are more important than theological issues, such as justification and Scripture (pp. 9, 17ff, 32-41, 120).

· That our former enemies such as Muslims are now our friends (pp.9, 37).

· That Muslims and Christians serve the same God (pp. 30,31).

· That Protestant and Roman Catholics are now in agreement on the gospel (pp. 35-36).

· That Confucius, Buddha, Muhammad, and the Greek philosophers such as Socrates were all on the right track spiritually, all offer insights into God and are now in Heaven (Chapter 6).

· The Roman Catholic Church is the highest expression of true religion (p.109).

· Martin Luther and Thomas Aquinas, while differing on details, were both Christians who taught essentially the same truths (Chapter 7). “Luther and Aquinas do not teach different religions but different theologies” (p.113, 142), whatever that means.

· The Catholic Eucharist is the only proper understanding of the Lord’s supper (Chapter 8).

On the basis of these views Ecumenical Jihad calls for the evangelical community to unite with Catholics, Muslims, Eastern Religions, Judaism and all other major religions in the war on the sins of society. This is a dangerous book, especially if we take Colson and Packer’s advice and take seriously the possibility that Kreeft is right.

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