Gentle and Lowly, the Heart of Christ For Sinners and Sufferers

Using the Puritans, especially Thomas Goodwin, as his guiding interpretive model (p. 14), Dane Ortlund sets out to write a book about the heart of Christ—who He really is (p. 13). The target audience is: “. . . The discouraged, the frustrated, the weary, the disenchanted, the cynical, the empty. Those running on fumes. Those whose Christian lives feel like constantly running up a descending escalator” (p. 13). The strategy being employed is to “take either a Bible passage or a bit of teaching from the Puritans or others and consider what is being said about the heart of God and of Christ” (p. 15). The controlling text, however, is Matthew 11:28-30 in which Jesus describes Himself as gentle and lowly.” This is the one place, the author writes, where Jesus tells us His heart—what He truly is (pp. 17-19). The essence of Jesus is gentle, meek, humble and...

Toward an Exegetical Theology, Biblical Exegesis for Preaching and Teaching by Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.

Walter Kaiser’s classic book on exegesis and preaching is still valuable and greatly needed.  His concern, when he wrote in 1981, was to close the gap that existed between the study of the text of Scripture and the delivery of the message (pp. 8, 48).  That gap still exists today, and thus the current need to continue to study Toward an Exegetical Theology.  Kaiser calls his approach the syntactical-theological method of exegesis and sermon building (p. 9).  There are two issues being addressed:  exegesis and delivery of the exegetical message. The bulk of the book explores the first of these, including discussions concerning hermeneutics (pp. 25-30), authorial intent (pp. 21, 33, 59, 79, 83, 106), differences between meaning and significance (p. 32), definition of exegesis (pp. 43-44), and the history and importance of gramatico-historical hermeneutics (pp. 44-47, 55, 60-61, 87-89, 197), although Kaiser proposes a name change to syntactical-theological...