Muslim Dreams and Visions

(Volume 22, Issue 5, September/October 2016) In recent years the stories of Muslims responding to the gospel, either directly or indirectly, as a result of dreams and visions have been abundant.  In these dreams it is reported that Jesus (or Isa as the Muslims call Him) appears and then directs the individual to someone who will share the gospel with them or, on some occasions Isa will preach the good news directly. Rick Kronk’s opening story in his book Dreams and Visions, Muslim’s Miraculous Journey to Jesus, is representative.  I will quote it in part: While I napped, I began to dream, and then suddenly that dream was interrupted and I found myself surrounded by bright light and white clouds.  Everything seemed so inviting and tranquil.   Then I saw beams of light streaming past me from behind.  I felt welcoming warmth upon my back from the light.  I turned, and…

Homosexuality, The Most Pressing Issue of Our Times

(Volume 21, Issue 6, Nov/Dec 2015) In 1979, Francis Schaeffer wrote, The thinkables of the eighties and nineties will certainly include things which most people today find unthinkable and immoral, even unimaginable and too extreme to suggest. Yet—since they do not have some overriding principle that takes them beyond relativistic thinking—when these become thinkable and acceptable in the eighties and nineties, most people will not even remember that they were unthinkable in the seventies. They will slide into each new thinkable without a jolt.[1] Schaeffer was referencing issues such as abortion, in the wake of the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973. Abortion, which previously had been recognized as evil, was at the time rapidly finding acceptance in American culture. In light of shifting values concerning abortions, Schaeffer predicted similar devolution in other moral areas. Would he be surprised by today’s approval and promotion of all things homosexual? What was…

An Evaluation of Muslim Dreams & Visions of Isa (Jesus) Part 2 by Dennis McBride

  August/September 2013, Volume 19, Issue 4  This is part two of the article by Pastor Dennis McBride on Muslim dreams and visions of Isa (Jesus).  In the June/July publication of TOTT, Pastor McBride discussed the four representative descriptions of the Muslim dreams phenomenon and examined the first 10 primary considerations of this subject.  In this publication he will finish discussing the primary considerations and conclude his thoughts. Gary E. Gilley Beginning of Part 2 of the article by Pastor Dennis McBride 11. Are New Testament visions a pattern for Muslim dreams? Descriptive or Prescriptive? One task of an interpreter of Scripture is to determine if a passage is descriptive or prescriptive. In other words, does the passage describe what occurred in the past, or does it prescribe what will or should occur in the future, or both? For example, determining if the Acts chapter two account of the Day of…

An Evaluation of Muslim Dreams & Visions of Isa (Jesus) Part 1 by Dennis McBride

June/July 2013, Volume 19, Issue 3  Much confusion surrounds the numerous stories coming from Islamic people concerning their dreams and visions leading to conversions. “Think on These Things” published an article by Richard Fisher in 2008 entitled “Don’t You Believe It.” The next two issues will be composed of an article written by Pastor Dennis McBride. I believe Pastor McBride has done an excellent and thorough job of analyzing these experiences in the light of Scripture. Gary E. Gilley Beginning of article by Pastor Dennis McBride My Goal: The goal of this paper is to evaluate the reported phenomenon of Jesus (Isa) appearing to some Muslims in dreams and visions [1], and to discern if such reports fit the pattern of Scripture as determined through conservative grammatical/historical principles of interpretation (hermeneutics). My Concerns: I first became aware of the Muslin dreams phenomenon through a Christian brother who spoke with great…

The Manhattan Declaration

(February/March 2010 – Volume 16, Issue 1) The Christian village is all abuzz these days about The Manhattan Declaration, yet another brainchild of Charles Colson (along with Timothy George and Robert George) in his ever vigilant attempts at societal improvement and ecumenical unity.   In his earlier efforts, in particular the Evangelicals and Catholics Together documents, Colson and Roman Catholic priest John Neuhaus attempted, with some apparent success, to convince Christendom that their two separate traditions held far more in common than it realized and it was time for both sides to lay down their arms and unite against liberal Christianity and secular ideology for the good of society.  While admitting that strong differences still remained, Colson, Neuhaus and their supporters tried to maintain that the two communities were preaching essentially the same gospel message and therefore it was time to join forces against their greater enemies. The Manhattan Declaration addresses…

Joel Osteen and The Prosperity Gospel

(June/July 2009 – Volume 15, Issue 4) The New Age book and video by Rhonda Byrne, The Secret, which gained popularity recently due to Oprah Winfrey’s strong promotion, teaches that we can “create [our] own happiness through the law of attraction.”  Whether it is cash, health, prosperity or happiness, all can be ours if we will just learn to use “the secret.”  Byrne tells us, “Disease cannot live in a body that is in a healthy emotional state.” But be warned: “If you have a disease and you are focusing on it and talking to people about it, you are going to create more disease cells.”[1] Such rhetoric should sound familiar to anyone even faintly aware of the Word of Faith Movement, often termed “the prosperity gospel.”  This group has been infiltrating evangelicalism for decades and is now the fastest growing segment of Christianity in the world.  Some have estimated…

The New Atheism

(February 2009 – Volume 15, Issue 2) There is much buzz lately about the so-called “New Atheism.” This seems to be an odd term given the fact that there are not very many ways that a person can spin atheism – old atheism denied the existence of God and new atheism does the same, so what is the difference? There is a sense in which even old atheism is new; after all, until the Enlightenment of the eighteenth century real atheists were hard to find. It is true that practical atheism can be traced throughout history. Psalm 14:1 speaks of such a man, termed a fool, who says in his heart, “There is no God.” Most see this fool not as a philosophical atheist who mentally denies the existence of God, but as one who lives as if God does not exist, even though intellectually he knows better. Of course the…

Don’t You Believe It

(October 2008 – Volume 14, Issue 11) I often receive inquiries concerning supposed conversions, especially among Muslim people, as a result of visions, dreams and other direct revelations. Stories are abundant of such events and are quickly passed along by well-meaning Christians. But can these stories be verified? Are they true or just rumors? Where is the documentation? Pastor Richard Fisher has written an excellent article on this subject for the March 2008 issue of Personal Freedom Outreach Journal. With PFO’s and Pastor Fisher’s permission we are reprinting that article in this month’s issue of Think on These Things. – Gary E. Gilley Things keep getting stranger. The “Father of Lies” seems to be operating in high gear and discernment appears to be at an all- time low. It is as if we are in the days of Judges again, when “everyone did what was right in his own eyes”…

C.S. Lewis

(September 2006 – Volume 12, Issue 8)  There is probably no Christian in modern times better known or more influential than Clive Staples Lewis. Born in Belfast in the year 1899, Lewis would write dozens of books on a variety of topics before his death on November 22, 1963 (on the very day of the deaths of John Kennedy and Aldous Huxley). At the time of his death his popularity was starting to wane but shortly thereafter there was a revival of interest in Lewis and, arguably, today he is more deeply admired than ever. He is considered by many to be the greatest apologist for the Christian faith to have ever lived. Whether you agree with this assessment or not, there is no doubt that Lewis was in a league almost by himself in his ability to write great truths in ways that spoke to our hearts and opened our…

Wild at Heart – Part 2

(May 2004 – Volume 10, Issue 5)  Last month we began an evaluation of the extremely popular book Wild at Heart authored by John Eldredge. At that time we identified a number of concerns with Eldredge’s message. We will now conclude this evaluation with some even deeper concerns. UNBIBLICAL VIEWS OF SATAN How deeply Eldredge has indulged himself in the unbiblical spiritual warfare methodology so popular today is hard to tell, but there is no question that he misunderstands the devil. First, he believes the devil fears the courageous Christian man (pp. 87, 166). On the contrary, God warns us of our arrogance in attempting to deal with the devil (Jude 8-10; 2 Peter 2:10-12), and calls for us to stand firm (Ephesians 6:10-13) and resist, not attack (1 Peter 5:8-9; James 4:6). Next, rather than recognizing that our sinful flesh is the primary, if not exclusive, source of our evil…

Wild at Heart – Part 1

(April 2004 – Volume 10, Issue 4) One of the most popular fads at the moment, at least among Christian men, centers around John Eldredge’s extremely popular book, Wild at Heart: Discovering the Secret of a Man’s Soul. The book itself has won numerous awards and kudos including the 2002 Gold Medallion Book Award (for the finest in evangelical publishing), the Family Christian Bookstores 2002 book of the year award, and an endorsement from Charles Swindoll, who declares, “I believe it is the best, most insightful book I have read in at least the last five years.” The book itself is only the tip of the iceberg. There is the Wild at Heart field manual, the Wild at Heart journal, video curriculum, facilitator, kits with DVD’s ($100), and an audio book. Then there are the Wild at Heart four-day retreats, or “Boot Camps.” And for those who want the ultimate (and…

War

(April 2003 – Volume 9, Issue 4)  Christians have long struggled with the issue of war. Are there any circumstances that justify a Christian going to war? In the light of the biblical commands to love and forgive our enemies, is war justified? Let’s take a look. Christian Views Radical Pacifism – Radical pacifists believe that all violence is evil, and therefore, not only is war wrong but so is the maintenance of a police force and personal resistance to aggression. After all, they reason, it is rather difficult to love your enemy when you are killing them or punching them in the face. What would be the response of a radical pacifist to the crimes of Osama bin Laden? Love! Alice Walker, writing for the Village Voice, represents this position well: “What would happen to him if he could be brought to understand the preciousness of the lives he has…

Twenty Facts About Israel and the Middle East

(March 2003 – Volume 9, Issue 3)  The world’s attention has been focused on the Middle East. We are confronted daily with scenes of carnage and destruction. Can we understand such violence? Yes, but only if we come to the situation with a solid grounding in the facts of the matter — facts that too often are forgotten, if ever they were learned. Below are twenty facts that we think are useful in understanding the current situation, how we arrived here, and how we might eventually arrive at a solution. Roots of the Conflict When the United Nations proposed the establishment of two states in the region — one Jewish, one Arab — the Jews accepted the proposal and declared their independence in 1948. The Jewish state constituted only 1/6 of one percent of what was known as “the Arab world.” The Arab states, however, rejected the UN plan and since…

The Shack – A Book Review

(September 2008 – Volume 14, Issue 9)  One of the most popular and controversial Christian books of recent years is the fictional work by first time author William Young. Evangelical recording artist Michael W. Smith states, “The Shack will leave you craving for the presence of God.” Author Eugene Peterson believes “this book has the potential to do for our generation what John Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress did for his. It’s that good!” On the other hand, seminary president Al Mohler says the book “includes undiluted heresy” and many concur. Given its popularity (number one on the New York Times bestseller list for paperback fiction), influence and mixed reviews, we need to take a careful look. Good Christian fiction has the ability to get across a message in an indirect, non-threatening yet powerful, way. Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress is the most successful in the genre and has been mightily used of the Lord…

The Secret Critiqued – Part 2

(August 2007 – Volume 13, Issue 8)  The Secret’s Links with Christianity New Thought In my research for this paper I was surprised to find that we have been down this road in the past. As a matter of fact, virtually the whole “secret” was revealed in the mid-1800s beginning with Phineas Quimby who taught that “physical diseases are caused by wrong thinking or false beliefs. Disease is merely an ‘error’ created ‘not by God, but by man.’ Eliminate false beliefs, Quimby taught, and the chief culprit for disease is thereby removed, yielding a healthy body.” [1] The New Thought movement developed from Quimbly’s ideas in the late 1860s. “According to New Thought, human beings can experience health, success, and abundant life by using their thoughts to define the conditions of their lives. New Thought proponents subscribed to the ‘law of attraction’ [the same law behind The Secret] which is the…

The Secret Critiqued – Part 1

(July 2007 – Volume 13, Issue 7)  Have you heard The Secret? It is all the rage throughout our society and has even infiltrated the church. From day-time talk shows to the business world, The Secret (detailed in both book and DVD forms) is making an impact. The inspiration behind The Secret came in 2004 when an old book called The Science of Getting Rich was placed in the hands of a woman named Rhonda Byrne. Byrne was going through a difficult period in her life and the message in this book rejuvenated her imagination. Over the course of the next two months Byrne read hundreds of books and studied the lives of great leaders in history. She discovered, she claims, that many greats from the past (e.g. Churchill, Einstein, Emerson), as well as the present (e.g. Jack Canfield, author and co-creator of the bestselling Chicken Soup for the Soul series),…

The Passion of the Christ – Part 2

(March 2004 – Volume 10, Issue 3)  THE ROAD TO ROME? As little as twenty years ago it was the overwhelming consensus of Protestant evangelicals and fundamentalists that those who adhered to the Roman Catholic doctrine of justification were not saved. That did not mean that Catholic Christians did not exist, for it was recognized that within the Church of Rome existed regenerate souls who for various reasons had remained in the Catholic Church. But none who clearly understood and accepted the soteriology of Rome could be viewed as born again. Rome’s salvation is sacramental in nature. Salvation, Catholics teach, is by grace, through faith, based on the cross. But to this they add an elaborate system of works which are also necessary for salvation. Still even this is not enough, for final authority for eternal salvation lies in the hands of the Church. All of this, and more, is proof…

The Passion of the Christ – Part 1

(February 2004 – Volume 10, Issue 2)  Mel Gibson’s movie The Passion of the Christ is being welcomed in conservative Christian circles with almost universal acclaim. Some Christian leaders have even said that the film will be the greatest opportunity for evangelism since the crucifixion itself. Perhaps they are correct. From almost all accounts The Passion of the Christ is relatively faithful to the biblical record. But such is not the case. The movie goes far beyond the biblical account, adding not only dramatic license, but much that is found in Roman Catholic tradition and mysticism. This may, or may not, diminish from the overall message of the film, but at the very least it will lead to confusion, especially for those not biblically knowledgeable, as to which events actually took place and which events came from the imagination of the writers and others. A few other scenes are taken from…

The Da Vinci Code Deciphered

(March 2006 – Volume 12, Issue 3)  The most celebrated novel of our times is much more than a novel. The Da Vinci Code has sold some forty million copies, just a drop in the bucket compared to the number of people who will view the movie starring everybody’s most beloved actor, Tom Hanks, and directed by none other than Opie (aka Ron Howard). As a result, before the close of 2006 the majority of those in the Western world will probably be introduced to the mysterious code popularized by Dan Brown. They will no doubt find this code both intriguing and troubling. It is intriguing because Brown is a fascinating author. The Da Vinci Code is unquestionably a great novel by literary standards and, if it was only a novel, would not be worth our time to examine in this venue. But it is troubling because Brown has a clear…

Spiritual Warfare – Part 3

 (June 1995 – Volume 1, Issue 8) The Bible does not recognize occult sin as a special category that has not been dealt with at the cross. We have spent considerable space in our last two newsletters evaluating and criticizing the Spiritual Warfare Movement. In this final letter on this subject, we would like to devote the bulk of our attention to the Biblical instructions that our Lord gives us concerning our battle with Satan and his demons. But first, we would like to elaborate a little on four of the major unbiblical teachings of the SW leaders. MAJOR UNBIBLICAL TEACHINGS: Christians must learn to bind Satan. This idea is based on the misinterpretation of three passages: Mt 12:29; 16:19; and 18:18. The context reveals that Mt 12:29 was an illustration of Christ’s personal power over Satan — not ours. And Mt 16:19; 18:18 are in the context of fulfilling God’s…

Spiritual Warfare – Part 2

(May 1995 – Volume 1,(May 1995 – Volume 1, Issue 7) Issue 7)  We quickly examined, in our last newsletter, the branch of the Spiritual Warfare Movement known by some as the “power encounter” branch. These are men such as Mark Bubeck and C. Fred Dickason who believe that we must forceably confront, bind, and expel demons from the lives of some people if they are to find spiritual freedom. This time we will turn our attention to the “truth encounter” branch of the SWM. This branch is well represented by Neil Anderson who, while in general agreement with Dickason and Bubeck, believes that power encounters are not necessary, in fact may be dangerous. He teaches instead, a more clinical approach which directs the demonized to take certain steps based on truth. When those steps are taken, the demons will release their victim from bondage. We want to carefully study this aspect…

Spiritual Warfare – Part 1

(April 1995 – Volume 1, Issue 6)  According to Dickason, God neglected to include in His Word instructions for victory over one of the Christian’s most powerful enemies. It seems that Christians never tire of trying to come up with a new way of dealing with life. We are reminded of the Athenians at the Areopagus who, “Used to spend their time in nothing other than telling or hearing something new” (Acts 17:21). Within evangelical Christianity today, there is a constant parade of novel approaches for dealing with our sins and problems. One of these is what some call “spiritual warfare.” Spiritual warfare has become quite the rage in many Christian circles, despite the lack of Biblical support. This is due to several factors: the mystical and experience orientation of the modern church, the influence of charismatic elements, pragmatism, the church’s surrender to psychology during the last twenty years, and endorsement…

Robert Schuller – The Humpty Dumpty of Evangelicalism

(March 2008 – Volume 14, Issue 3)  You might recall that, when Alice was conversing with Humpty Dumpty, she rebuked him for misusing words. Humpty replied, “When I use a word, it means just what I choose it to mean – neither more nor less.” Alice protested, asking if he could really make words mean different things, to which Humpty answered, “The question is, which is to be the master – that is all.” This approach to words and their meanings has been common among theological liberals and cultists for years. Visit the worship service of any liberal church and most likely you will hear much that seems to define and frame orthodox biblical truth. Listen more carefully and you will soon realize that the words and phrases have been infused with new meaning. They have, if I could make up my own word, been humptified. There is nothing novel or…

Postmodernism – Part 5

(February 2003 – Volume 9, Issue 2)  “Confronting Postmodernists” In previous papers I have discussed postmodernity’s encroachment on Western society and on the church, and identified the dangers and impact of this worldview. What do we do now? I believe we must be willing to go against the grain of a condoning society and display some holy intolerance. Doing so will surely be painful. We will be disliked, misunderstood, even vilified – but of course we will be in good company. Jesus, the prophets and the apostles all suffered a similar fate at the hands of unbelievers and sometimes even fellow believers. But did not Jesus pronounce us blessed when “men cast insults at you, and persecute you, and say all kinds of evil against you falsely, on account of Me” (Matthew 5:11)? This is not the time to cave into the pressures that surround us; it is the time to…

Postmodernism – Part 4

(January 2003 – Volume 9, Issue 1)  “Postmodernity and the Church” At certain points in history the church has served as a rebuke to the secular mindset of society. At such times Christians have challenged and exposed the popular fads that ruled the day, revealing those fads for what they were, shallow and empty, mere “broken cisterns that can hold no water” (Jeremiah 2:13). Sadly, now is not one of those points in history. Rather, the Christian community at the present time appears to be in lock step with the world system. Whatever the world is selling Christians seem to be buying. They may perfume it a bit, hang some religious ornaments on it, and throw some scriptures into the mix, but when stripped to its essence evangelicals frequently find themselves mimicking the world’s philosophy. We find this true with regard to postmodernity. Rather than repel the forces leading this ungodly…

Postmodernism – Part 3

(December 2002 – Volume 8, Issue 9)  “Postmodernity and Society” Having raced far too briefly through an overview of postmodernism, we will now turn our attention to an equally brief account of this worldview’s impact on society. Let’s begin with Western culture. Since absolute truth has been rejected, how does a postmodern society function? There exists a number of identifiable pillars propping up the postmodern vision – each of these pillars depend upon the others to prevent collapse of the system. As we will see, postmodernity is an inconsistent philosophy at best. Truth Is Communal We documented in an earlier paper that while postmodernity rejects absolute, universal truth, it does not reject all standards of truth. Drawing from the well of existentialism, which championed individualized truth, this newer worldview (which by the way claims to reject worldviews) believes in communal truth. That is, each culture creates its own truth, and the…

Postmodernism – Part 2

(November 2002 – Volume 8, Issue 8)  “Whatever Happened to Truth?” The main character in Jean-Paul Sartre’s famous novel, Nausea, examines life carefully and comes to these gloomy conclusions; “I was just thinking, that here we sit, all of us, eating and drinking to preserve our precious existence and really there is nothing, nothing, absolutely no reason for existing…. I exist – the world exists – and I know that the world exists. That’s all. It makes no difference to me…. Every existing thing is born without reason, prolongs itself out of weakness and dies by chance…. I do not believe in God; His existence is belied by science. But, in the internment camp, I learned to believe in men.” Sartre was a leading proponent of the philosophical system known as existentialism, which was a reaction to the materialistic optimism of modernity with its infinite faith in reason and science. The…

Postmodernism – Part 1

(September/October 2002 – Volume 8, Issue 7)  A Historical Overview A great enemy has died – but few heard about the funeral. As a matter of fact many deny that she is dead at all. She was too tough, too mean; we fought her too long. But the evidence is in: Secular Humanism, which thrived under the shadow of modernity, and whom for decades we blamed for all the ills of society and church, has apparently passed away. Funerals are usually solemn occasions, but in this case we should rather rejoice. The “mean old witch, the wicked witch is dead.” But before we start doing cartwheels, we had better look over our shoulder – her sister has shown up and things have just gone from bad to worse. Humanism’s evil sister flies under the handle of postmodernism, and everywhere one turns these days she shows her ugly face. Both in the…

Islam – Part 2

(February 2002 – Volume 8, Issue 2)  The Modern Mindset of the Islamic People Time magazine tries to calm our nerves with these words, “If the evil carnage we witnessed on September 11 were typical of the faith, and Islam truly inspired and justified such violence, its growth and the increasing presence of Muslims in both Europe and the U.S. would be a terrifying prospect. Fortunately, this is not the case. The very word Islam, which means, “surrender,” is related to the Arabic, salim, or peace…. In the Koran…the only permissible war is one of self-defense…. Islam is not addicted to war, and jihad is not one of its “pillars,” or essential practices…. Islam did not impose itself by the sword.” The author of these words is overly optimistic, at best. First, the word Islam means “submission.” The word for peace in Arabic is “salam”, and while both words come from…

Islam – Part 1

(January 2002 – Volume 8, Issue 1)  Before September 11th, most of us had little understanding of, and/or interest in the Islamic religion, but all of that has changed. What kind of people, we now want to know, purposely destroy so many innocent lives in the name of their God? Evil and wicked people we understand, but the Muslim fanatics claim to be righteous. They seem to actually believe that they are waging a great war between good and evil, and that they are the ones wearing the white hats. What, if anything, does Islam teach that could lead these men to murder people, even at the expense of their own lives, while believing they are pleasing God? Are the terrorists representative of the Islamic faith or a fanatical fringe? These are important questions, especially in light of so much misleading information about Islam pouring from our media. The Islamic religion…

Examination of Life After Death Experiences

(July 1995 – Volume 1, Issue 9) Woody Allen expressed the sentiments of many when he stated, “Who cares about achieving immortality through achievements? I’m interested in achieving immortality through not dying.” Mankind has always feared death (Heb 2:15), and rightly so. Death is one of the great motivators towards the consideration of our need for a relationship with God. However, in recent years new hope has emerged for those desiring heaven without the bother of a commitment to Christ. In the 1970’s a book by Raymond Moody, Life After Life, made a tremendous impact with numerous and believable stories of people coming back from the dead. Those returning to life often reported similar experiences. A composite experience includes moving through a long, dark tunnel (after being pronounced dead), watching resuscitation efforts from “outside” one’s body, being greeted by relatives or friends who had died earlier, encountering a being of light…

Dominion Theology

(January 1996 – Volume 2, Issue 3) There is a movement about that is casting a long shadow for its size. It is known by different handles such as reconstructionism, kingdom theology, theonomy, and dominion theology, and it is a curious blend of Reformed/Calvinist theology and Charismatic influence. While there are relatively few who would call themselves reconstructionists, a number of the movement’s ideas have infiltrated the thinking and actions of many believers, often without them knowing it. The movement is led by such theologians as Rousas J. Rusdoony; Gary North; Ray Sutton; Greg Bahnsen; David Chiltion, and by Charismatic leaders such as Earl Paulk. But their ideas are often reflected by non-reconstructionists such as Pat Robertson, John Whitehead, Franky Schaeffer, and even Jerry Falwell. A DEFINITION Dominion theology (the belief-system behind the reconstructionist movement) teaches that through the coming of Christ the believer has dominion over every area of life.…

A Biblical Screening of Jim Cymbala’s Book, ‘Fresh Wind, Fresh Fire’

(December 1998 – Volume 4, Issue 11) The motivation behind reading this book was both a rave review from an IFCA (Independent Fundamental Churches of America) communiqué (written by Steve Johnson, member of the publication committee), which was also published by the IFCA bulletin service; and an equally positive book review in Voice (the IFCA magazine) by Richard McCarrell. I will quote McCarrell’s review in total, for context: Vance Havner loved telling of two Indians watching the construction of a lighthouse. It was finally completed, and the big day arrived for its opening. As dignitaries gathered, the worst fog of the season blew in. One Indian turned to the other and said, “Light shine, bell ring, horn blow, fog come in just the same.” Vance Havner would then say, “We’ve never had more lights shining, bells ringing, and horns blowing than we have today within the church. Yet, we’ve never had…